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Art via Aaron McConnell

Some of us live for it, that feeling of a freight train hitting you when you realize the brilliance of something. Last night, I had this feeling when I was playing my Forgeborn Sorcerer for the first time in our rebooted Eberron game. His name is Shade and some of you have probably seen his one unique thing: I am an animated suit of armor… with the wearer still inside. A little morbid but I feel like maybe that’s what Eberron needs a little more of. But I’m not here to blab about my campaign.

The brilliance didn’t lie within the build of the character, no, it was the fact that you could have two vastly difference sorcerers using the same rules. When we were in combat, I was thinking about how a player in the group ran his sorcerer, Daemon, during the previous campaign. Every round was gather power, unleash hell, repeat. Sound strategy, I must say. There was an instance he did 300 hit points of damage, and we were all impressed. That’s what Josh does as a player though, builds an uber powerful character that wreaks havoc on any who stand against him.  Not exactly my personal play style, but it is definitely fun to have that sort of artillery in your party. With Shade, I really wanted to capture the idea of being a walking suit of armor. I was intensely surprised when push came to shove and the first fight of the night broke out to see that my goal had been reached.

While doling out a good amount of damage, Shade has a high armor class for a 4th level sorcerer, 18, with his PD not lagging far behind at 17. Of course, with the way this game works, the MD suffers but it’s not too often you have to rely on it anyhow. Just this vast stat difference from Daemon made me realize, “Holy crap! I created a completely different sorcerer that’s different mechanically, not just in role play!” Such a rare occurrence to me in most game rules. Usually, classes tend to be pretty similar regardless of character. So this got me thinking about the rest of the book. Was this possible all around? Obviously, with the closer look, yes!

Whether you’re a wizard, fighter or rogue, you can build completely different play styles using the rules in the core book alone. It’s baffling to me, even though I’ve talked about it before. In the post, Get Some Class!: Brief Overview, I talked about the idea of class diversity and how each class as a list of different build styles. Only last night, did I bring the obvious idea on the page to real life. It blew me away. Have any cool class build diversity stories? Leave a comment below! I’d love to hear about it.

Stay Metal \m/

And before we close this, for anyone interested, here is Shade!

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